Víðidalstunguheiði

Distance from Reykjavík:

210km

Season:

When the road opens - 30.September

Average size:

1-2 pounds

Number of rods:

Unlimited

Tackle:

Fly, bait and spinners

Fishing equipment:

The best flies:

Lodging:

Accessability:

4x4 - Mixed

Map

Viðidalstunguheiði in Vestur-Húnavatnssýsla is at an elevation of about 550 meters above sea level and encompasses 6 lakes along with numerous small streams, all teeming with fish. Predominantly inhabited by Arctic char, some parts of the area also contain brown trout. The journey to the lakes is exclusively for four-wheel-drive vehicles, covering approximately 45 kilometers from Víðidalur to Kolgrímsvötn and shorter distances to the others. This is an exciting fishing experience for everyone. The heath is often accessible only around mid-summer, and anglers are advised to check road conditions before embarking. Fishing is consistently excellent from mid-July to late August.

Kolgrímsvötn:

Kolgrímsvötn consists of three lakes with areas ranging from 0.11 to 0.40 km². Both Arctic char and trout are found in the lakes with average sizes around 1-2 pounds

Hólmavatn:

Covering an area of approximately 0.62 km², Hólmavatn is a prolific fishing spot. The lake primarily hosts char, with an average size around 2 pounds. The lake is easily accessible, but only by four-wheel-drive vehicles.

Melrakkavatn:

Melrakkavatn is an intriguing char lake, rumored to house some truly remarkable specimens. Although predominantly one-pound char are found here, exploratory fishing is recommended.

Þrístikkla:

This body of water is essentially two lakes, hosting small char.  A jeep track leads to the lake. The lake is about 0.7 km² in size.

Bergárvatn:

Bergárvatn exclusively contains Arctic char. It is the nearest lake on the heath and the first encountered. The lake offers ample char fishing and provides an adventurous experience. The lake covers about 1.3 km², and a 4×4 trail leads to it.

Skálsvatn:

Skálsvatn, a small lake of approximately 0.5 km², holds a considerable stock of char. Skálslækur runs from the lake to the Víðidalsá River. Although the lake has seen decreased interest in recent years, it is worth taking a short hike from the road, about half a kilometer.

Bergá:

Originating from Bergárvatn, the Bergá River flows into Víðidalsá. The ten-kilometer-long river is known for char fishing, predominantly sourced from Bergárvatn. Fishing is usually best in the upper part of the river, and the peak season is from mid-July to September. Bergá is considered suitable for introducing young anglers to fly-fishing. Hike in from the sign marked “Bergá.”

Öxná:

Flowing from Hólmavatn, Öxná River is small but holds fish.

Haugakvísl:

This small river can offer both char and trout fishing. It originates from the outer and inner Haugakvísl rivers, which stem from streams on the heath, merging into Haugakvísl and then into Víðidalsá.

Sandfellskvísl:

A small river that holds small char, Sandfellskvísl falls into Víðidalsá.

Dauðsmannskvísl:

This river runs from Fellaskáli and is accessible in the surrounding area. It has a distinct name, Dauðsmannskvísl, meaning “Deadmansfork”, Once it meets Sandfellskvísl the two rivers form Víðidalsá.

General Information:

When traveling to the heath, a jeep trail is taken from Víðidal near Hrappsstöðum, crossing the bridge over Bergá and proceeding past the heath enclosure. Those heading to Bergá can follow signs with the river’s name. Those heading to the lakes continue and turn off the trail at signs with the names of the lakes. From Hrappsstöðum, it’s about 45 km to Kolgrímsvötn and much shorter distances to the other lakes.

Anglers are kindly requested to tread lightly, not drive off-road, and carry out all litter. Those wishing to use the hiking trails on the heath should contact the trail wardens.

MAP

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Accessability

  • Easy – Very little hiking required, easy for every one.
  • Modrate – Some hiking required.
  • Hard – Strenuous hiking require, good physical conditions required.
  • Mixed – Some easy access areas and others that require hiking.